Somaliland

Recognition of Somaliland – claiming our rightful place within the community of nations.

We are confident we will achieve our goal and we will never relinquish our rightful demand for international recognition. The sooner that aspiration is fulfilled, the better it will be for everybody in the region and the world at large.

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Somaliland in brief

After conclusion of treaties between Great Britain and the various Somaliland clans in the early 1880s, the Somaliland Protectorate was proclaimed in 1887

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Built in Color Schemes

What we have done

Over two decades, Somaliland has built a successful market economy, with GDP rising to $350 per capita – higher than Tanzania ($280), Eritrea ($190) and Ethiopia ($100).

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Global

International Backing

Somaliland has entered into informal and formal relationships with a number of other states, and has also achieved de facto recognition from a number of other nations.

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Consistent Support

The Statehood Attributes

It is undeniable that Somaliland does indeed qualify for statehood, and it is incumbent on the international community to recognise it… Any efforts to deny or delay….

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Strengthening relations with the world

Despite its unrecognised status, Somaliland has entered into informal and formal relationships with a number of other states, and has also achieved de facto recognition from a number of other nations around the world.

Somaliland has established offices in the USA, Canada, UK, Sweden, France, Norway, Belgium (Brussels) Ethiopia, Djibouti, Ghana, Kenya, South Sudan, South Africa and Yemen, and people have travelled with the Somaliland passport to South Africa, Kenya, Djibouti and Ethiopia, Uganda, UK, Sweden, USA.

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Why recognition is so important

The people of Somaliland – 97.9% of whom voted for the country’s constitution which enshrines independence – also feel passionately that they have the right to self-determination. In order to:

  • Built a successful free-market economy
  • Cultivated a stable, multiparty democracy
  • Legitimate legal right to be recognized
  • Historical right to be recognized
  • Non-recognition imposes costs on the country
  • Raise funds on international capital markets
  • Trapping the population behind its borders

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What the Govt is doing

Somaliland is building its relationships with key multilateral institutions such as the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), the UN and the African Development Bank

Affilliations

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The European Union welcomes the contribution that Somaliland is making to peace and good governance in the region. It is an encouraging example of peace, democracy and stability.- Andris Piebalgs, EU Commissioner for Development